Swimming with Sharks in the Bahamas

The One With the Bloody Nose

Yup, you read that right! No better time to get a bloody nose than when you’re scuba diving with over 40 sharks. Earlier in the summer, I had two sinus infections as well as an ear infection. When you’re scuba diving and you descend deeper into the ocean, you have to equalize the pressure build up from your sinus cavities by popping your ears. Similar to what you experience when you descend on an airplane. The nosebleed was most likely caused by my left ear’s inability to equalize. Obviously, I made it through the experience in one piece but what I came away with was something far more valuable than just another log in my dive book. I finished my second dive, at Stuart Cove’s Dive, with a whole new outlook on a beautiful creature that once upon a time I feared to no end. When I think about it, in every shark movie I’ve ever seen, the tiniest scratch of blood will turn any shark into a cold-blooded killing machine. While it is true that some sharks have killed before, it may be possible that these massive creatures are just severely misunderstood.

So let’s look at some facts about the Carribean Reef Shark…

“While it is considered dangerous to humans, this shark does not have a history of attacks on humans.”

“Although laws ban the hunting or fishing of this species, the fishing industry in South America still finds these sharks in about 40% of their fish catch. While the catches are unintended, there has still been a drastic impact on the population and the population continues to dwindle.”

When we look at facts about sharks as a populous…

“The odds of getting attacked and killed by a shark are 1 in 3,748,067. In a lifetime, you are more likely to die from fireworks, lightning, drowning, a car accident, or heart disease.”

“There are 70 to 100 shark attacks worldwide every year, 5 to 15 result in death.”

“Over 100 million sharks are taken every year by humans. That is approximately 11,000 sharks killed every hour.”

In conclusion, these beautiful creatures are being hunted to the point of extinction. Without sharks, the ocean’s ecosystem will collapse. With no large predators to monitor the fish population, the ocean’s plankton will, in theory, go extinct as well. Scientists believe that phytoplankton is responsible for creating 50 to 85 percent of the world’s oxygen. These tiny ocean plants use photosynthesize – that is, they use sunlight and carbon dioxide to make food. A byproduct of photosynthesis is oxygen. So for every other breath you take, you can thank these tiny ocean plants.

My hope is that by watching this video you’ll see just how majestic these creatures are and why they’re worthy of our protection. The dive master, Evan (who you can see feeding the sharks in the video), explains that not only do the sharks remember the boats that belong to Stuart’s Cove, but they also remember the dive masters. I witnessed one shark snuggle under his arm and sit on his lap waiting to be pet, just like a dog. The sharks are naturally inquisitive of you and their eyes will move and follow you, meaning they show signs of curiosity and intelligence.  You may even notice some of the sharks have scars and scratches from hooks used and left by fishing boats. I managed to get one close up of a shark who they’ve dubbed, “The Joker,” after the sides of his mouth were altered from embedded hooks. Once every few month’s, the dive masters will remove these hooks in their efforts to conserve and protect these species. I would rate my experience and satisfaction with Stuart Cove’s Dive a 10/10 and would highly recommend.

 

Thank you, Stuart Cove’s Dive!

Riss

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